Advocacy

2021

THE FOLLOWING FAQ LIST IS FROM THE U.S. TREASURY  DEPARTMENT REGARDING THE CORONAVIRUS STATE AND LOCAL FISCAL RECOVERY FUNDS.  THE INFORMATION CAN ALSO BE FOUND AT https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/SLFRPFAQ.pdf

Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds
Frequently Asked Questions

AS OF JUNE 10, 2021
This document contains answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Coronavirus State and
Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (CSFRF / CLFRF, or Fiscal Recovery Funds). Treasury will be updating
this document periodically in response to questions received from stakeholders.
Recipients and stakeholders should consult the Interim Final Rule for additional information.

• For overall information about the program, including information on requesting funding, please
see https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/coronavirus/assistance-for-state-local-
and-tribal-governments

• For general questions about CSFRF / CLFRF, please email SLFRP@treasury.gov

• Treasury is seeking comment on all aspects of the Interim Final Rule. Stakeholders are
encouraged to submit comments electronically through the Federal eRulemaking Portal
(https://www.regulations.gov/document/TREAS-DO-2021-0008-0002) on or before July 16, 2021.

Please be advised that comments received will be part of the public record and subject to public
disclosure. Do not disclose any information in your comment or supporting materials that you
consider confidential or inappropriate for public disclosure.

Questions added 5/27/21: 1.5, 1.6, 2.13, 2.14, 2.15, 3.9, 4.5, 4.6, 10.3, 10.4 (noted with
“[5/27]”)

Questions added 6/8/21: 2.16, 3.10, 3.11, 3.12, 4.7, 6.7, 8.2, 9.4, 9.5, 10.5 (noted with “[6/8]”)

Answers to frequently asked questions on distribution of funds to non-entitlement units of local
government (NEUs) can be found in this FAQ supplement, which is regularly updated.

1. Eligibility and Allocations

1.1. Which governments are eligible for funds?
The following governments are eligible:
• States and the District of Columbia
• Territories
• Tribal governments
• Counties
• Metropolitan cities
• Non-entitlement units, or smaller local governments

1.2. Which governments receive funds directly from Treasury?

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Treasury will distribute funds directly to each eligible state, territory, metropolitan city,
county, or Tribal government. Smaller local governments that are classified as non- entitlement
units will receive funds through their applicable state government.

1.3. Are special-purpose units of government eligible to receive funds?

Special-purpose units of local government will not receive funding allocations; however, a state,
territory, local, or Tribal government may transfer funds to a special-purpose unit of government.
Special-purpose districts perform specific functions in the community, such as fire, water, sewer
or mosquito abatement districts.

1.4. How are funds being allocated to Tribal governments, and how will Tribal governments find
out their allocation amounts?

$20 billion of Fiscal Recovery Funds was reserved for Tribal governments. The American Rescue Plan
Act specifies that $1 billion will be allocated evenly to all eligible Tribal governments. The
remaining $19 billion will be distributed using an allocation methodology based on enrollment and
employment.

There will be two payments to Tribal governments. Each Tribal government’s first payment will
include (i) an amount in respect of the $1 billion allocation that is to be divided equally among
eligible Tribal governments and (ii) each Tribal government’s pro rata share of the Enrollment
Allocation. Tribal governments will be notified of their allocation amount and delivery of payment
4-5 days after completing request for funds in the Treasury Submission Portal. The deadline to
make the initial request for funds is June 21, 2021.1

In mid-June or shortly after completing the initial request for funds, Tribal governments will
receive an email notification to re-enter the Treasury Submission Portal to confirm or amend their
2019 employment numbers that were submitted to the Department of the Treasury for the CARES Act’s
Coronavirus Relief Fund. The deadline to confirm employment numbers is July 9, 2021. Treasury
will calculate each Tribal government’s pro rata share of the Employment Allocation for those
Tribal governments that confirmed or submitted amended employment numbers. In late-June, Treasury
will communicate to Tribal governments the amount of their portion of the Employment Allocation and
the anticipated date for the second payment.

1.5. My county is a unit of general local government with population under 50,000. Will my
county receive funds directly from Treasury? [5/27]

Yes. All counties that are units of general local government will receive funds directly from
Treasury and should apply via the online portal. The list of county allocations is available here.

1 This document was updated on June 10, 2021 to reflect the extension of the two portal submission
deadlines.

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1.6. My local government expected to be classified as a non-entitlement unit. Instead, it was
classified as a metropolitan city. Why? [5/27]

The American Rescue Plan Act defines, for purposes of the Coronavirus Local Fiscal Recovery Fund
(CLFRF), metropolitan cities to include those that are currently metropolitan cities under the
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program but also those cities that relinquish or defer
their status as a metropolitan city for purposes of the CDBG program. This would include, by way
of example, cities that are principal cities of their metropolitan statistical area, even if their
population is less than 50,000. In other words, a city that is eligible to be a metropolitan city
under the CDBG program is eligible as a metropolitan city under the CLFRF, regardless of how that
city has elected to participate in the CDBG program.

Unofficial allocation estimates produced by other organizations may have classified certain local
governments as non-entitlement units of local government. However, based on the statutory
definitions, some of these local governments should have been classified as metropolitan cities.

2. Eligible Uses – Responding to the Public Health Emergency / Negative Economic Impacts
2.1. What types of COVID-19 response, mitigation, and prevention activities are eligible?

A broad range of services are needed to contain COVID-19 and are eligible uses, including
vaccination programs; medical care; testing; contact tracing; support for isolation or quarantine;
supports for vulnerable populations to access medical or public health services; public health
surveillance (e.g., monitoring case trends, genomic sequencing for variants); enforcement of public
health orders; public communication
efforts; enhancement to health care capacity, including through alternative care facilities;
purchases of personal protective equipment; support for prevention, mitigation, or other services
in congregate living facilities (e.g., nursing homes, incarceration settings, homeless shelters,
group living facilities) and other key settings like schools; ventilation improvements in
congregate settings, health care settings, or other key locations; enhancement of public health
data systems; and other public health responses. Capital investments in public facilities to meet
pandemic operational needs are also eligible, such as physical plant improvements to public
hospitals and health clinics or adaptations to public buildings to implement COVID-19 mitigation
tactics.

2.2. If a use of funds was allowable under the Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) to respond to the
public health emergency, may recipients presume it is also allowable under CSFRF/CLFRF?

Generally, funding uses eligible under CRF as a response to the direct public health impacts of
COVID-19 will continue to be eligible under CSFRF/CLFRF, with the

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following two exceptions: (1) the standard for eligibility of public health and safety payrolls has
been updated; and (2) expenses related to the issuance of tax-anticipation notes are not an
eligible funding use.

2.3. If a use of funds is not explicitly permitted in the Interim Final Rule as a response to
the public health emergency and its negative economic impacts, does that mean it is prohibited?

The Interim Final Rule contains a non-exclusive list of programs or services that may be funded as
responding to COVID-19 or the negative economic impacts of the COVID-19 public health emergency,
along with considerations for evaluating other potential uses of Fiscal Recovery Funds not
explicitly listed. The Interim Final Rule also provides
flexibility for recipients to use Fiscal Recovery Funds for programs or services that are not
identified on these non-exclusive lists but which meet the objectives of section 602(c)(1)(A) or
603(c)(1)(A) by responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency with respect to COVID-19 or its
negative economic impacts.

2.4. May recipients use funds to respond to the public health emergency and its negative
economic impacts by replenishing state unemployment funds?

Consistent with the approach taken in the CRF, recipients may make deposits into the state account
of the Unemployment Trust Fund up to the level needed to restore the pre- pandemic balances of such
account as of January 27, 2020 , or to pay back advances received for the payment of benefits
between January 27, 2020 and the date when the Interim Final Rule is published in the Federal
Register.

2.5. What types of services are eligible as responses to the negative economic impacts of the
pandemic?

Eligible uses in this category include assistance to households; small businesses and non –
profits; and aid to impacted industries.

Assistance to households includes, but is not limited to: food assistance; rent, mortgage, or
utility assistance; counseling and legal aid to prevent eviction or homelessness; cash assistance;
emergency assistance for burials, home repairs, weatherization, or other needs; internet access or
digital literacy assistance; or job training to address negative economic or public health impacts
experienced due to a worker’s occupation or level of training.

Assistance to small business and non-profits includes, but is not limited to:
• loans or grants to mitigate financial hardship such as declines in revenues or impacts of
periods of business closure, for example by supporting payroll and benefits costs, costs to retain
employees, mortgage, rent, or utilities costs, and other operating costs;
• Loans, grants, or in-kind assistance to implement COVID-19 prevention or mitigation tactics,
such as physical plant changes to enable social distancing,

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enhanced cleaning efforts, barriers or partitions, or COVID-19 vaccination, testing, or contact
tracing programs; and
• Technical assistance, counseling, or other services to assist with business planning needs

2.6. May recipients use funds to respond to the public health emergency and its negative
economic impacts by providing direct cash transfers to households?

Yes, provided the recipient considers whether, and the extent to which, the household has
experienced a negative economic impact from the pandemic. Additionally, cash transfers must be
reasonably proportional to the negative economic impact they are intended to address. Cash
transfers grossly in excess of the amount needed to address the negative economic impact identified
by the recipient would not be considered to be a response to the COVID-19 public health emergency
or its negative impacts. In particular, when considering appropriate size of permissible cash
transfers made in response to the COVID-19 public health emergency, state, local, territorial, and
Tribal governments may consider and take guidance from the per person amounts previously provided
by the
federal government in response to the COVID crisis.

2.7. May funds be used to reimburse recipients for costs incurred by state and local governments
in responding to the public health emergency and its negative economic impacts prior to passage of
the American Rescue Plan?

Use of Fiscal Recovery Funds is generally forward looking. The Interim Final Rule permits funds to
be used to cover costs incurred beginning on March 3, 2021.

2.8. May recipients use funds for general economic development or workforce development?

Generally, not. Recipients must demonstrate that funding uses directly address a negative economic
impact of the COVID-19 public health emergency, including funds used for economic or workforce
development. For example, job training for unemployed workers may be used to address negative
economic impacts of the public health emergency and be eligible.

2.9. How can recipients use funds to assist the travel, tourism, and hospitality industries?

Aid provided to tourism, travel, and hospitality industries should respond to the negative economic
impacts of the pandemic. For example, a recipient may provide aid to support safe reopening of
businesses in the tourism, travel and hospitality industries and to districts that were closed
during the COVID-19 public health emergency, as well as aid a planned expansion or upgrade of
tourism, travel and hospitality facilities delayed due to the pandemic.

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Tribal development districts are considered the commercial centers for tribal hospitality, gaming,
tourism and entertainment industries.

2.10. May recipients use funds to assist impacted industries other than travel, tourism, and
hospitality?

Yes, provided that recipients consider the extent of the impact in such industries as compared to
tourism, travel, and hospitality, the industries enumerated in the statute. For example,
nationwide the leisure and hospitality industry has experienced an approximately 17 percent decline
in employment and 24 percent decline in revenue, on net, due to the COVID-19 public health
emergency. Recipients should also consider whether impacts were due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as
opposed to longer-term economic or industrial trends unrelated to the pandemic.

Recipients should maintain records to support their assessment of how businesses or business
districts receiving assistance were affected by the negative economic impacts of the pandemic and
how the aid provided responds to these impacts.

2.11. How does the Interim Final Rule help address the disparate impact of COVID-19 on certain
populations and geographies?

In recognition of the disproportionate impacts of the COVID-19 virus on health and economic
outcomes in low-income and Native American communities, the Interim Final Rule identifies a broader
range of services and programs that are considered to be in response to the public health emergency
when provided in these communities.
Specifically, Treasury will presume that certain types of services are eligible uses when provided
in a Qualified Census Tract (QCT), to families living in QCTs, or when these services are provided
by Tribal governments.

Recipients may also provide these services to other populations, households, or geographic areas
disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. In identifying these disproportionately-impacted
communities, recipients should be able to support their determination for how the pandemic
disproportionately impacted the populations, households, or geographic areas to be served.

Eligible services include:

• Addressing health disparities and the social determinants of health, including: community
health workers, public benefits navigators, remediation of lead paint or other lead hazards, and
community violence intervention programs;

• Building stronger neighborhoods and communities, including: supportive housing and other
services for individuals experiencing homelessness, development of
affordable housing, and housing vouchers and assistance relocating to neighborhoods with higher
levels of economic opportunity;

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• Addressing educational disparities exacerbated by COVID-19, including: early learning
services, increasing resources for high-poverty school districts, educational services like
tutoring or afterschool programs, and supports for students’ social, emotional, and mental health
needs; and

• Promoting healthy childhood environments, including: child care, home visiting programs for
families with young children, and enhanced services for child welfare-involved families and foster
youth.

2.12. May recipients use funds to pay for vaccine incentive programs (e.g., cash or in-kind
transfers, lottery programs, or other incentives for individuals who get vaccinated)?

Yes. Under the Interim Final Rule, recipients may use Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery
Funds to respond to the COVID-19 public health emergency, including expenses related to COVID-19
vaccination programs. See forthcoming 31 CFR 35.6(b)(1)(i). Programs that provide incentives
reasonably expected to increase the number of people who choose to get vaccinated, or that motivate
people to get vaccinated sooner than they otherwise would have, are an allowable use of funds so
long as such costs are reasonably proportional to the expected public health benefit.

2.13. May recipients use funds to pay “back to work incentives” (e.g., cash payments for newly
employed workers after a certain period of time on the job)? [5/27]

Yes. Under the Interim Final Rule, recipients may use Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery
Funds to provide assistance to unemployed workers. See forthcoming 31 CFR 35.6(b)(4). This
assistance can include job training or other efforts to accelerate rehiring and thus reduce
unemployment, such as childcare assistance, assistance with transportation to and from a jobsite or
interview, and incentives for newly employed workers.

2.14. The Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) included as an eligible use: “Payroll expenses for public
safety, public health, health care, human services, and similar employees whose services are
substantially dedicated to mitigating or responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency.” What
has changed in CSFRF/CLFRF, and what type of documentation is required under CSFRF/CLFRF? [5/27]

Many of the expenses authorized under the Coronavirus Relief Fund are also eligible uses under the
CSFRF/CLFRF. However, in the case of payroll expenses for public safety, public health, health
care, human services, and similar employees (hereafter, public health and safety staff), the
CSFRF/CLFRF does differ from the CRF. This change
reflects the differences between the ARPA and CARES Act and recognizes that the response to the
COVID-19 public health emergency has changed and will continue to change over time. In particular,
funds may be used for payroll and covered benefits expenses for public safety, public health,
health care, human services, and similar employees, including first responders, to the extent that
the employee’s time that is dedicated to responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency.

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For administrative convenience, the recipient may consider a public health and safety employee to
be entirely devoted to mitigating or responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency, and
therefore fully covered, if the employee, or his or her operating unit or division, is primarily
dedicated (e.g., more than half of the employee’s time is dedicated) to responding to the COVID-19
public health emergency.

Recipients may use presumptions for assessing whether an employee, division, or operating unit is
primarily dedicated to COVID-19 response. The recipient should maintain records to support its
assessment, such as payroll records, attestations from supervisors or staff, or regular work
product or correspondence demonstrating work on the COVID-19 response. Recipients need not
routinely track staff hours. Recipients should periodically reassess their determinations.

2.15. What staff are included in “public safety, public health, health care, human services, and
similar employees”? Would this include, for example, 911 operators, morgue staff, medical examiner
staff, or EMS staff? [5/27]

As discussed in the Interim Final Rule, funds may be used for payroll and covered benefits expenses
for public safety, public health, health care, human services, and similar employees, for the
portion of the employee’s time that is dedicated to responding to the COVID-19 public health
emergency.

Public safety employees would include police officers (including state police officers), sheriffs
and deputy sheriffs, firefighters, emergency medical responders, correctional and detention
officers, and those who directly support such employees such as dispatchers and supervisory
personnel. Public health employees would include employees involved in providing medical and other
health services to patients and supervisory personnel, including medical staff assigned to schools,
prisons, and other such institutions, and other support services essential for patient care (e.g.,
laboratory technicians, medical examiner or morgue staff) as well as employees of public health
departments directly engaged in matters related to public health and related supervisory personnel.
Human services staff include employees providing or administering social services; public
benefits; child
welfare services; and child, elder, or family care, as well as others.

2.16. May recipients use funds to establish a public jobs program? [6/8]

Yes. The Interim Final Rule permits a broad range of services to unemployed or underemployed
workers and other individuals that suffered negative economic impacts from the pandemic. That can
include public jobs programs, subsidized employment, combined education and on-the-job training
programs, or job training to accelerate rehiring or address negative economic or public health
impacts experienced due to a
worker’s occupation or level of training. The broad range of permitted services can also include
other employment supports, such as childcare assistance or assistance with transportation to and
from a jobsite or interview.

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The Interim Final Rule includes as an eligible use re-hiring public sector staff up to the
government’s level of pre-pandemic employment. “Public sector staff” would not include individuals
participating in a job training or subsidized employment program administered by the recipient.

3. Eligible Uses – Revenue Loss
3.1. How is revenue defined for the purpose of this provision?

The Interim Final Rule adopts a definition of “General Revenue” that is based on, but not
identical, to the Census Bureau’s concept of “General Revenue from Own Sources” in the Annual
Survey of State and Local Government Finances.

General Revenue includes revenue from taxes, current charges, and miscellaneous general revenue.
It excludes refunds and other correcting transactions, proceeds from issuance of debt or the sale
of investments, agency or private trust transactions, and revenue generated by utilities and
insurance trusts. General revenue also includes intergovernmental transfers between state and
local governments, but excludes intergovernmental transfers from the Federal government, including
Federal transfers made via a state to a locality pursuant to the CRF or the Fiscal Recovery Funds.

Tribal governments may include all revenue from Tribal enterprises and gaming operations in the
definition of General Revenue.

3.2. Will revenue be calculated on an entity-wide basis or on a source-by-source basis (e.g.
property tax, income tax, sales tax, etc.)?

Recipients should calculate revenue on an entity-wide basis. This approach minimizes the
administrative burden for recipients, provides for greater consistency across recipients, and
presents a more accurate representation of the net impact of the COVID- 19 public health emergency
on a recipient’s revenue, rather than relying on
financial reporting prepared by each recipient, which vary in methodology used and which generally
aggregates revenue by purpose rather than by source.

3.3. Does the definition of revenue include outside concessions that contract with a state or
local government?

Recipients should classify revenue sources as they would if responding to the U.S.
Census Bureau’s Annual Survey of State and Local Government Finances. According to the Census
Bureau’s Government Finance and Employment Classification manual, the
following is an example of current charges that would be included in a state or local government’s
general revenue from own sources: “Gross revenue of facilities operated by a government (swimming
pools, recreational marinas and piers, golf courses, skating rinks, museums, zoos, etc.); auxiliary
facilities in public recreation areas (camping areas,

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refreshment stands, gift shops, etc.); lease or use fees from stadiums, auditoriums, and community
and convention centers; and rentals from concessions at such facilities.”

3.4. What is the time period for estimating revenue loss? Will revenue losses experienced prior
to the passage of the Act be considered?

Recipients are permitted to calculate the extent of reduction in revenue as of four points in time:
December 31, 2020; December 31, 2021; December 31, 2022; and December 31, 2023. This approach
recognizes that some recipients may experience lagged effects of the pandemic on revenues.

Upon receiving Fiscal Recovery Fund payments, recipients may immediately calculate revenue loss for
the period ending December 31, 2020.

3.5. What is the formula for calculating the reduction in revenue?

A reduction in a recipient’s General Revenue equals:

See: 061521.pdf

Where:

Base Year Revenue is General Revenue collected in the most recent full fiscal year prior to the
COVD-19 public health emergency.

Growth Adjustment is equal to the greater of 4.1 percent (or 0.041) and the recipient’s average
annual revenue growth over the three full fiscal years prior to the COVID-19 public health
emergency.

n equals the number of months elapsed from the end of the base year to the calculation date.

Actual General Revenue is a recipient’s actual general revenue collected during 12-month period
ending on each calculation date.

Subscript t denotes the calculation date.

3.6. Are recipients expected to demonstrate that reduction in revenue is due to the COVID-19
public health emergency?

In the Interim Final Rule, any diminution in actual revenue calculated using the formula above
would be presumed to have been “due to” the COVID-19 public health emergency. This presumption is
made for administrative ease and in recognition of the broad-based economic damage that the
pandemic has wrought.

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3.7. May recipients use pre-pandemic projections as a basis to estimate the reduction in
revenue?

No. Treasury is disallowing the use of projections to ensure consistency and comparability across
recipients and to streamline verification. However, in estimating the revenue shortfall using the
formula above, recipients may incorporate their average annual revenue growth rate in the three
full fiscal years prior to the public health emergency.

3.8. Once a recipient has identified a reduction in revenue, are there any restrictions on how
recipients use funds up to the amount of the reduction?

The Interim Final Rule gives recipients broad latitude to use funds for the provision of government
services to the extent of reduction in revenue. Government services can include, but are not
limited to, maintenance of infrastructure or pay-go spending for building new infrastructure,
including roads; modernization of cybersecurity, including hardware, software, and protection of
critical infrastructure; health services; environmental remediation; school or educational
services; and the provision of police, fire, and other public safety services.

However, paying interest or principal on outstanding debt, replenishing rainy day or other reserve
funds, or paying settlements or judgments would not be considered provision of a government
service, since these uses of funds do not entail direct provision of services to citizens. This
restriction on paying interest or principal on any outstanding debt instrument, includes, for
example, short-term revenue or tax anticipation notes, or paying fees or issuance costs associated
with the issuance of new debt. In addition, the overarching restrictions on all program funds
(e.g., restriction on pension deposits, restriction on using funds for non-federal match where
barred by regulation or statute) would apply.

3.9. How do I know if a certain type of revenue should be counted for the purpose of computing
revenue loss? [5/27]

As discussed in FAQ #3.1, the Interim Final Rule adopts a definition of “General
Revenue” that is based on, but not identical, to the Census Bureau’s concept of “General Revenue
from Own Sources” in the Annual Survey of State and Local Government Finances.

Recipients should refer to the definition of “General Revenue” included in the Interim Final Rule.
See forthcoming 31 CFR 35.3. If a recipient is unsure whether a particular revenue source is
included in the Interim Final Rule’s definition of “General Revenue,” the recipient may consider
the classification and instructions used to complete the Census Bureau’s Annual Survey.

For example, parking fees would be classified as a Current Charge for the purpose of the Census
Bureau’s Annual Survey, and the Interim Final Rule’s concept of “General

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Revenue” includes all Current Charges. Therefore, parking fees would be included in the Interim
Final Rule’s concept of “General Revenue.”

The Census Bureau’s Government Finance and Employment Classification manual is available here.

3.10. In calculating revenue loss, are recipients required to use audited financials? [6/8]

Where audited data is not available, recipients are not required to obtain audited data. Treasury
expects all information submitted to be complete and accurate. See 31 CFR 35.4(c).

3.11. In calculating revenue loss, should recipients use their own data, or Census data? [6/8]

Recipients should use their own data sources to calculate general revenue, and do not need to rely
on published revenue data from the Census Bureau. Treasury acknowledges that due to differences in
timing, data sources, and definitions, recipients’ self-reported general revenue figures may differ
somewhat from those published by the Census Bureau.

3.12. Should recipients calculate revenue loss on a cash basis or an accrual basis? [6/8]

Recipients may provide data on a cash, accrual, or modified accrual basis, provided that recipients
are consistent in their choice of methodology throughout the covered period and until reporting is
no longer required.

4. Eligible Uses – General
4.1. May recipients use funds to replenish a budget stabilization fund, rainy day fund, or
similar reserve account?

No. Funds made available to respond to the public health emergency and its negative economic
impacts are intended to help meet pandemic response needs and provide immediate stabilization for
households and businesses. Contributions to rainy day funds and similar reserves funds would not
address these needs or respond to the COVID-19 public health emergency, but would rather be savings
for future spending needs.
Similarly, funds made available for the provision of governmental services (to the extent of
reduction in revenue) are intended to support direct provision of services to citizens.
Contributions to rainy day funds are not considered provision of government services, since such
expenses do not directly relate to the provision of government services.

4.2. May recipients use funds to invest in infrastructure other than water, sewer, and broadband
projects (e.g. roads, public facilities)?

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Under 602(c)(1)(C) or 603(c)(1)(C), recipients may use funds for maintenance of
infrastructure or pay-go spending for building of new infrastructure as part of the general
provision of government services, to the extent of the estimated reduction in revenue due to the
public health emergency.

Under 602(c)(1)(A) or 603(c)(1)(A), a general infrastructure project typically would not be
considered a response to the public health emergency and its negative economic impacts unless the
project responds to a specific pandemic-related public health need (e.g., investments in facilities
for the delivery of vaccines) or a specific negative economic impact of the pandemic (e.g.,
affordable housing in a Qualified Census Tract).

4.3. May recipients use funds to pay interest or principal on outstanding debt?

No. Expenses related to financing, including servicing or redeeming notes, would not address the
needs of pandemic response or its negative economic impacts. Such expenses would also not be
considered provision of government services, as these financing expenses do not directly provide
services or aid to citizens.

This applies to paying interest or principal on any outstanding debt instrument, including, for
example, short-term revenue or tax anticipation notes, or paying fees or issuance costs associated
with the issuance of new debt.

4.4. May recipients use funds to satisfy nonfederal matching requirements under the Stafford
Act? May recipients use funds to satisfy nonfederal matching requirements generally?

Fiscal Recovery Funds are subject to pre-existing limitations in other federal statutes and
regulations and may not be used as non-federal match for other Federal programs whose statute or
regulations bar the use of Federal funds to meet matching requirements. For example, expenses for
the state share of Medicaid are not an eligible use. For information on FEMA programs, please see
here.

4.5. Are governments required to submit proposed expenditures to Treasury for approval? [5/27]

No. Recipients are not required to submit planned expenditures for prior approval by Treasury.
Recipients are subject to the requirements and guidelines for eligible uses contained in the
Interim Final Rule.

4.6. How do I know if a specific use is eligible? [5/27]

Fiscal Recovery Funds must be used in one of the four eligible use categories specified in the
American Rescue Plan Act and implemented in the Interim Final Rule:

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a) To respond to the public health emergency or its negative economic impacts, including
assistance to households, small businesses, and nonprofits, or aid to impacted industries such as
tourism, travel, and hospitality;

b) To respond to workers performing essential work during the COVID-19 public health emergency by
providing premium pay to eligible workers;

c) For the provision of government services to the extent of the reduction in revenue due to the
COVID–19 public health emergency relative to revenues collected in the most recent full fiscal year
prior to the emergency; and

d) To make necessary investments in water, sewer, or broadband infrastructure.

Recipients should consult Section II of the Interim Final Rule for additional information on
eligible uses. For recipients evaluating potential uses under (a), the Interim Final Rule contains
a non-exclusive list of programs or services that may be funded as responding to COVID-19 or the
negative economic impacts of the COVID-19 public health emergency, along with considerations for
evaluating other potential uses of Fiscal Recovery Funds not explicitly listed. See Section II of
the Interim Final Rule for additional discussion.

For recipients evaluating potential uses under (c), the Interim Final Rule gives recipients broad
latitude to use funds for the provision of government services to the extent of reduction in
revenue. See FAQ #3.8 for additional discussion.

For recipients evaluating potential uses under (b) and (d), see Sections 5 and 6.

4.7. Do restrictions on using Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds to cover costs
incurred beginning on March 3, 2021 apply to costs incurred by the recipient (e.g., a State, local,
territorial, or Tribal government) or to costs incurred by households, businesses, and individuals
benefiting from assistance provided using Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds? [6/8]

The Interim Final Rule permits funds to be used to cover costs incurred beginning on March 3, 2021.
This limitation applies to costs incurred by the recipient (i.e., the state, local, territorial, or
Tribal government receiving funds). However, recipients may use Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal
Recovery Funds to provide assistance to households, businesses, and individuals within the eligible
use categories described in the Interim Final Rule for economic harms experienced by those
households, businesses, and individuals prior to March 3, 2021. For example,

• Public Health/Negative Economic Impacts – Recipients may use Coronavirus State and Local
Fiscal Recovery Funds to provide assistance to households – such as rent, mortgage, or utility
assistance – for economic harms experienced or costs incurred by the household prior to March 3,
2021 (e.g., rental arrears from preceding months), provided that the cost of providing assistance
to the household was not incurred by the recipient prior to March 3, 2021.

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• Premium Pay – Recipients may provide premium pay retrospectively for work performed at any
time since the start of the COVID-19 public health emergency. Such premium pay must be “in addition
to” wages and remuneration already received and the obligation to provide such pay must not have
been incurred by the recipient prior to March 3, 2021.
• Revenue Loss – The Interim Final Rule gives recipients broad latitude to use funds for the
provision of government services to the extent of reduction in
revenue. The calculation of lost revenue begins with the recipient’s revenue in the last full
fiscal year prior to the COVID-19 public health emergency and includes the 12-month period ending
December 31, 2020. However, use of funds
for government services must be forward looking for costs incurred by the recipient after March 3,
2021.
• Investments in Water, Sewer, and Broadband – Recipients may use Coronavirus State and Local
Fiscal Recovery Funds to make necessary investments in water, sewer, and broadband. See FAQ
Section 6. Recipients may use Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds to cover costs
incurred for eligible projects planned or started prior to March 3, 2021, provided that the project
costs covered by the Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds were incurred after March 3,
2021.

5. Eligible Uses – Premium Pay

5.1. What criteria should recipients use in identifying essential workers to receive premium
pay?

Essential workers are those in critical infrastructure sectors who regularly perform in – person
work, interact with others at work, or physically handle items handled by others.

Critical infrastructure sectors include healthcare, education and childcare, transportation,
sanitation, grocery and food production, and public health and safety, among others, as provided in
the Interim Final Rule. Governments receiving Fiscal Recovery Funds have the discretion to add
additional sectors to this list, so long as the sectors are considered critical to protect the
health and well-being of residents.

The Interim Final Rule emphasizes the need for recipients to prioritize premium pay for lower
income workers. Premium pay that would increase a worker’s total pay above 150% of the greater of
the state or county average annual wage requires specific
justification for how it responds to the needs of these workers.

5.2. What criteria should recipients use in identifying third-party employers to receive grants
for the purpose of providing premium pay to essential workers?

Any third-party employers of essential workers are eligible. Third-party contractors who employ
essential workers in eligible sectors are also eligible for grants to provide

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premium pay. Selection of third-party employers and contractors who receive grants is at the
discretion of recipients.

To ensure any grants respond to the needs of essential workers and are made in a fair and
transparent manner, the rule imposes some additional reporting requirements for grants to
third-party employers, including the public disclosure of grants provided.

5.3. May recipients provide premium pay retroactively for work already performed?

Yes. Treasury encourages recipients to consider providing premium pay retroactively for work
performed during the pandemic, recognizing that many essential workers have not yet received
additional compensation for their service during the pandemic.

6. Eligible Uses – Water, Sewer, and Broadband Infrastructure

6.1. What types of water and sewer projects are eligible uses of funds?

The Interim Final Rule generally aligns eligible uses of the Funds with the wide range of types or
categories of projects that would be eligible to receive financial assistance through the
Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) or Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund (DWSRF).

Under the DWSRF, categories of eligible projects include: treatment, transmission and distribution
(including lead service line replacement), source rehabilitation and decontamination, storage,
consolidation, and new systems development.

Under the CWSRF, categories of eligible projects include: construction of publicly- owned treatment
works, nonpoint source pollution management, national estuary program projects, decentralized
wastewater treatment systems, stormwater systems, water conservation, efficiency, and reuse
measures, watershed pilot projects, energy efficiency measures for publicly-owned treatment works,
water reuse projects, security measures at publicly-owned treatment works, and technical assistance
to ensure compliance with the Clean Water Act.

As mentioned in the Interim Final Rule, eligible projects under the DWSRF and CWSRF support efforts
to address climate change, as well as to meet cybersecurity needs to protect water and sewer
infrastructure. Given the lifelong impacts of lead exposure for children, and the widespread nature
of lead service lines, Treasury also encourages recipients to consider projects to replace lead
service lines.

6.2. May construction on eligible water, sewer, or broadband infrastructure projects continue
past December 31, 2024, assuming funds have been obligated prior to that date?

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Yes. Treasury is interpreting the requirement that costs be incurred by December 31, 2024 to only
require that recipients have obligated the funds by such date. The period of performance will run
until December 31, 2026, which will provide recipients a reasonable amount of time to complete
projects funded with Fiscal Recovery Funds.

6.3. May recipients use funds as a non-federal match for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
(CWSRF) or Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF)?

Recipients may not use funds as a state match for the CWSRF and DWSRF due to prohibitions in
utilizing federal funds as a state match in the authorizing statutes and regulations of the CWSRF
and DWSRF.

6.4. Does the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) apply to eligible infrastructure
projects?

NEPA does not apply to Treasury’s administration of the Funds. Projects supported with payments
from the Funds may still be subject to NEPA review if they are also funded by other federal
financial assistance programs.

6.5. What types of broadband projects are eligible?

The Interim Final Rule requires eligible projects to reliably deliver minimum speeds of 100 Mbps
download and 100 Mbps upload. In cases where it is impracticable due to geography, topography, or
financial cost to meet those standards, projects must reliably deliver at least 100 Mbps download
speed, at least 20 Mbps upload speed, and be scalable to a minimum of 100 Mbps download speed and
100 Mbps upload speed.

Projects must also be designed to serve unserved or underserved households and businesses, defined
as those that are not currently served by a wireline connection that reliably delivers at least 25
Mbps download speed and 3 Mbps of upload speed.

6.6. For broadband investments, may recipients use funds for related programs such as
cybersecurity or digital literacy training?

Yes. Recipients may use funds to provide assistance to households facing negative economic impacts
due to Covid-19, including digital literacy training and other programs that promote access to the
Internet. Recipients may also use funds for modernization of cybersecurity, including hardware,
software, and protection of critical infrastructure, as part of provision of government services up
to the amount of revenue lost due to the public health emergency.

6.7. How do I know if a water, sewer, or broadband project is an eligible use of funds? Do I
need pre-approval? [6/8]

Recipients do not need approval from Treasury to determine whether an investment in a water, sewer,
or broadband project is eligible under CSFRF/CLFRF. Each recipient

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should review the Interim Final Rule (IFR), along with the preamble to the Interim Final Rule, in
order to make its own assessment of whether its intended project meets the eligibility criteria in
the IFR. A recipient that makes its own determination that a project meets the eligibility
criteria as outlined in the IFR may pursue the project as a CSFRF/CLFRF project without
pre-approval from Treasury. Local government recipients similarly do not need state approval to
determine that a project is eligible under CSFRF/CLFRF. However, recipients should be cognizant of
other federal or state laws or regulations that may apply to construction projects independent of
CSFRF/CLFRF
funding conditions and that may require pre-approval.
For water and sewer projects, the IFR refers to the EPA Drinking Water and Clean Water State
Revolving Funds (SRFs) for the categories of projects and activities that are eligible for funding.
Recipients should look at the relevant federal statutes, regulations, and guidance issued by the
EPA to determine whether a water or sewer project is eligible. Of note, the IFR does not
incorporate any other requirements contained in the federal statutes governing the SRFs or any
conditions or requirements that individual states may place on their use of SRFs.

7. Non-Entitlement Units (NEUs)
Answers to frequently asked questions on distribution of funds to NEUs can be found in this FAQ
supplement, which is regularly updated.

8. Ineligible Uses
8.1. What is meant by a pension “deposit”? Can governments use funds for routine pension
contributions for employees whose payroll and covered benefits are eligible expenses?

Treasury interprets “deposit” in this context to refer to an extraordinary payment into a pension
fund for the purpose of reducing an accrued, unfunded liability. More
specifically, the interim final rule does not permit this assistance to be used to make a payment
into a pension fund if both: (1) the payment reduces a liability incurred prior to the start of the
COVID-19 public health emergency, and (2) the payment occurs outside the recipient’s regular timing
for making such payments.

Under this interpretation, a “deposit” is distinct from a “payroll contribution,” which occurs when
employers make payments into pension funds on regular intervals, with contribution amounts based on
a pre-determined percentage of employees’ wages and salaries. In general, if an employee’s wages
and salaries are an eligible use of Fiscal Recovery Funds, recipients may treat the employee’s
covered benefits as an eligible use of Fiscal Recovery Funds.

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8.2. May recipients use Fiscal Recovery Funds to fund Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB)?
[6/8]

OPEB refers to benefits other than pensions (see, e.g., Governmental Accounting
Standards Board, “Other Post-Employment Benefits”). Treasury has determined that Sections
602(c)(2)(B) and 603(c)(2), which refer only to pensions, do not prohibit CSFRF/CLFRF recipients
from funding OPEB. Recipients of either the CSFRF/CLFRF may use funds for eligible uses, and a
recipient seeking to use CSFRF/CLFRF funds for OPEB contributions would need to justify those
contributions under one of the four eligible use categories.

9. Reporting
9.1. What records must be kept by governments receiving funds?

Financial records and supporting documents related to the award must be retained for a period of
five years after all funds have been expended or returned to Treasury, whichever is later. This
includes those which demonstrate the award funds were used for eligible purposes in accordance with
the ARPA, Treasury’s regulations implementing those sections, and Treasury’s guidance on eligible
uses of funds.

9.2. What reporting will be required, and when will the first report be due?

Recipients will be required to submit an interim report, quarterly project and expenditure reports,
and annual recovery plan performance reports as specified below, regarding their utilization of
Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds.

Interim reports: States (defined to include the District of Columbia), territories, metropolitan
cities, counties, and Tribal governments will be required to submit one interim report. The interim
report will include a recipient’s expenditures by category at the summary level and for states,
information related to distributions to non-entitlement units of local government must also be
included in the interim report. The interim report will cover activity from the date of award to
July 31, 2021 and must be submitted to Treasury by August 31, 2021. Non-entitlement units of local
government are not required to submit an interim report.

Quarterly Project and Expenditure reports: State (defined to include the District of Columbia),
territorial, metropolitan city, county, and Tribal governments will be required to submit quarterly
project and expenditure reports. This report will include financial data, information on contracts
and subawards over $50,000, types of projects funded, and other information regarding a recipient’s
utilization of award funds. Reports will be required quarterly with the exception of
non-entitlement units, which will report annually. An interim report is due on August 31, 2021.
The reports will include the same general data as those submitted by recipients of the Coronavirus
Relief Fund, with some modifications to expenditure categories and the addition of data elements
related to

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specific eligible uses. The initial quarterly Project and Expenditure report will cover two
calendar quarters from the date of award to September 30, 2021 and must be submitted to Treasury by
October 31, 2021. The subsequent quarterly reports will cover one calendar quarter and must be
submitted to Treasury within 30 days after the end of each calendar quarter.

Non-entitlement units of local government will be required to submit the project and expenditure
report annually. The initial annual Project and Expenditure report for non- entitlement units of
local government will cover activity from the date of award to September 30, 2021 and must be
submitted to Treasury by October 31, 2021. The subsequent annual reports must be submitted to
Treasury by October 31 each year.

Recovery Plan Performance reports: States (defined to include the District of Columbia),
territories, metropolitan cities, and counties with a population that exceeds 250,000 residents
will also be required to submit an annual recovery plan performance report to Treasury. This
report will include descriptions of the projects funded and information on the performance
indicators and objectives of each award, helping local residents understand how their governments
are using the substantial resources provided by Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds
program. The initial recovery plan performance report will cover activity from date of award to
July 31, 2021 and must be submitted to Treasury by August 31, 2021. Thereafter, the recovery plan
performance reports will cover a 12-month period and recipients will be required to submit the
report to Treasury within 30 days after the end of the 12-month period. The second Recovery Plan
Performance report will cover the period from July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022 and must be submitted
to Treasury by July 31, 2022. Each annual recovery plan performance report must be posted on the
public-facing website of the recipient. Local governments with fewer than 250,000 residents,
Tribal governments, and non-entitlement units of local government are not required to develop a
Recovery Plan Performance report.

Treasury will provide further guidance and instructions on the reporting requirements for program
at a later date.

9.3. What provisions of the Uniform Guidance for grants apply to these funds? Will the Single
Audit requirements apply?

Most of the provisions of the Uniform Guidance (2 CFR Part 200) apply to this program, including
the Cost Principles and Single Audit Act requirements. Recipients should refer to the Assistance
Listing for detail on the specific provisions of the Uniform Guidance that do not apply to this
program. The Assistance Listing will be available on beta.SAM.gov.

9.4. Once a recipient has identified a reduction in revenue, how will Treasury track use of
funds for the provision of government services? [6/8]

The ARPA establishes four categories of eligible uses and further restrictions on the use of funds
to ensure that Fiscal Recovery Funds are used within the four eligible use

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categories. The Interim Final Rule implements these restrictions, including the scope of the
eligible use categories and further restrictions on tax cuts and deposits into pensions. Reporting
requirements will align with this structure.

Consistent with the broad latitude provided to recipients to use funds for government services to
the extent of the reduction in revenue, recipients will be required to submit a description of
services provided. As discussed in IFR, these services can include a broad range of services but
may not be used directly for pension deposits, contributions to reserve funds, or debt service.
Recipients may use sources of funding other than Fiscal Recovery Funds to make deposits to pension
funds, contribute to reserve funds, and pay debt service, including during the period of
performance for the Fiscal Recovery Fund award.

For recipients using Fiscal Recovery Funds to provide government services to the extent of
reduction in revenue, the description of government services reported to Treasury may be narrative
or in another form, and recipients are encouraged to report based on their existing budget
processes and to minimize administrative burden. For example, a recipient with $100 in revenue
replacement funds available could indicate that $50 were used for personnel costs and $50 were used
for pay-go building of sidewalk
infrastructure.

In addition to describing the government services provided to the extent of reduction in revenue,
all recipients will also be required to indicate that Fiscal Recovery Funds are not used directly
to make a deposit in a pension fund. Further, recipients subject to the tax
offset provision will be required to provide information necessary to implement the Interim Final
Rule, as described in the Interim Final Rule. Treasury does not anticipate requiring other types
of reporting or recordkeeping on spending in pensions, debt service, or contributions to reserve
funds.

These requirements will be further detailed in forthcoming guidance on reporting requirements for
the Fiscal Recovery Funds.

9.5. What is the Assistance Listing and Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number for
the program? [6/8]

The Assistance Listing for the Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (CSLFRF) was
published May 28, 2021 on SAM.gov. This includes the final CFDA Number for the program, 21.027.

The assistance listing includes helpful information including program purpose, statutory authority,
eligibility requirements, and compliance requirements for recipients. The CFDA number is the
unique 5-digit code for each type of federal assistance, and can be used to search for program
information, including funding opportunities, spending on usaspending.gov, or audit results through
the Federal Audit Clearinghouse.

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To expedite payments and meet statutory timelines, Treasury issued initial payments under an
existing CFDA number. If you have already received funds or captured the initial CFDA number in
your records, please update your systems and reporting to reflect the final CFDA number 21.027.
Recipients must use the final CFDA number for all financial accounting, audits, subawards, and
associated program reporting requirements.

To ensure public trust, Treasury expects all recipients to serve as strong stewards of these funds.
This includes ensuring funds are used for intended purposes and recipients have in place effective
financial management, internal controls, and reporting for transparency and accountability.

Please see Treasury’s Interim Final Rule for more information. Further guidance on recipient
compliance and reporting responsibilities is forthcoming.

10. Miscellaneous
10.1. May governments retain assets purchased with Fiscal Recovery Funds? If so, what rules apply
to the proceeds of disposition or sale of such assets?

Yes, if the purchase of the asset was consistent with the limitations on the eligible use of funds.
If such assets are disposed of prior to December 31, 2024, the proceeds would be subject to the
restrictions on the eligible use of payments.

10.2. Can recipients use funds for administrative purposes?

Recipients may use funds to cover the portion of payroll and benefits of employees corresponding to
time spent on administrative work necessary due to the COVID–19 public health emergency and its
negative economic impacts. This includes, but is not limited to, costs related to disbursing
payments of Fiscal Recovery Funds and managing new grant programs established using Fiscal Recovery
Funds.

10.3. Are recipients required to remit interest earned on CSFRF/CLFRF payments made by Treasury?
[5/27]

No. CSFRF/CLFRF payments made by Treasury to states, territories, and the District of Columbia are
not subject to the requirement of the Cash Management Improvement Act and Treasury’s implementing
regulations at 31 CFR part 205 to remit interest to Treasury. CSFRF/CLFRF payments made by Treasury
to local governments and Tribes are not subject to the requirement of 2 CFR 200.305(b)(8)–(9) to
maintain balances in an interest-bearing account and remit payments to Treasury.

10.4. Is there a deadline to apply for funds? [5/27]

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The Interim Final Rule requires that costs be incurred by December 31, 2024. Eligible recipients
are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. For recipients other than Tribal governments, there is
not a specific application deadline.

Tribal governments do have deadlines to complete the application process and should visit
www.treasury.gov/SLFRPTribal for guidance on applicable deadlines.

10.5. May recipients use funds to cover the costs of consultants to assist with managing and
administering the funds? [6/8]

Yes. Recipients may use funds for administering the CSFRF/CLFRF program, including costs of
consultants to support effective management and oversight, including consultation for ensuring
compliance with legal, regulatory, and other requirements.

11. Operations
11.1. How do I know if my entity is eligible?

The Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 set forth
the jurisdictions eligible to receive funds under the program, which are:
• States and the District of Columbia
• Territories
• Tribal governments
• Counties
• Metropolitan cities (typically, but not always, those with populations over 50,000)
• Non-entitlement units of local government, or smaller local governments (typically, but not
always, those with populations under 50,000)

11.2. How does an eligible entity request payment?

Eligible entities (other than non-entitlement units) must submit their information to the Treasury
Submission Portal. Please visit the Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Fund website for
more information on the submission process.

11.3. I cannot log into the Treasury Submission Portal or am having trouble navigating it. Who
can help me?

If you have questions about the Treasury Submission Portal or for technical support, please email
covidreliefitsupport@treasury.gov.

11.4. What do I need to do to receive my payment?

All eligible payees are required to have a DUNS Number previously issued by Dun & Bradstreet
(https://www.dnb.com/).

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All eligible payees are also required to have an active registration with the System for Award
Management (SAM) (https://www.sam.gov).

And eligible payees must have a bank account enabled for Automated Clearing House (ACH) direct
deposit. Payees with a Wire account are encouraged to provide that
information as well.

More information on these and all program pre-submission requirements can be found on the
Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Fund website.

11.5. Why is Treasury employing id.me for the Treasury Submission Portal?

ID.me is a trusted technology partner to multiple government agencies and healthcare providers. It
provides secure digital identity verification to those government agencies and healthcare providers
to make sure you’re you – and not someone pretending to be you
– when you request access to online services. All personally identifiable information provided to
ID.me is encrypted and disclosed only with the express consent of the user. Please refer to ID.me
Contact Support for assistance with your ID.me account. Their support website is
https://help.id.me.

11.6. Why is an entity not on the list of eligible entities in Treasury Submission Portal?

The ARP statute lays out which governments are eligible for payments. The list of entities within
the Treasury Submission Portal includes entities eligible to receive a direct payment of funds from
Treasury, which include states (defined to include the District of Columbia), territories, Tribal
governments, counties, and metropolitan cities.

Eligible non-entitlement units of local government will receive a distribution of funds
from their respective state government and should not submit information to the Treasury Submission
Portal.

If you believe an entity has been mistakenly left off the eligible entity list, please email
SLFRP@treasury.gov.

11.7. What is an Authorized Representative?

An Authorized Representative is an individual with legal authority to bind the government entity
(e.g., the Chief Executive Officer of the government entity). An Authorized Representative must
sign the Acceptance of Award terms for it to be valid.

11.8. How does a Tribal government determine their allocation?

Tribal governments will receive information about their allocation when the submission to the
Treasury Submission Portal is confirmed to be complete and accurate.

11.9. How do I know the status of my request for funds (submission)?

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Entities can check the status of their submission at any time by logging into Treasury
Submission Portal.

11.10. My Treasury Submission Portal submission requires additional information/correction. What is
the process for that?

If your Authorized Representative has not yet signed the award terms, you can edit your submission
with in the into Treasury Submission Portal. If your Authorized Representative has signed the
award terms, please email SLFRP@treasury.gov to request assistance with updating your information.

11.11. My request for funds was denied. How do I find out why it was denied or appeal the
decision?

Please check to ensure that no one else from your entity has applied, causing a duplicate
submission. Please also review the list of all eligible entities on the Coronavirus State and Local
Fiscal Recovery Fund website.
If you still have questions regarding your submission, please email
SLFRP@treasury.gov.

11.12. When will entities get their money?
Before Treasury is able to execute a payment, a representative of an eligible government
must submit the government’s information for verification through the Treasury Submission Portal.
The verification process takes approximately four business days. If any errors are identified, the
designated point of contact for the government will be contacted via email to correct the
information before the payment can proceed. Once verification is complete, the designated point of
contact of the eligible government will receive an email notifying them that their submission has
been verified. Payments are generally scheduled for the next business day after this verification
email, though funds may not be available immediately due to processing time of their financial
institution.

11.13. How does a local government entity provide Treasury with a notice of transfer of funds to
its State?

For more information on how to provide Treasury with notice of transfer to a state, please
email SLRedirectFunds@treasury.gov.

Page 25

 

2019

Support Senate Bills 26 and 39- Senate Tax Tribunal Reform

Support House Bills 4025 and 4047- House Tax Tribunal Reform

Oppose House Bill 4046- Limits local control on rental housing

2018

Oppose House Bill 6049 and Senate Bill 1025: Require Municipalities to Consolidate Assessing Services

Oppose House Bill 6093- Requires Cities to Get Voter Approval in Order to Sell More than Five Acres of Land

Oppose Senate Bill 1031- Exempts Utility Companies from Personal Property Tax

Oppose House Bill 5634- Removes prohibition on window tinting and obstruction of driver’s vision

Oppose House Bill 4814- Limits Millage Elections to November Election

Oppose House Bill 5207- Single Party Primary Ballots

2017

Oppose House Bill 5098- Utility Relocation Regulations

Support Senate Bill 400 and House Bill 4651- Next Generation 911 Funding

Support House Bill 4290- Limiting local government liability in heavy rain events

Support House Bill 4100- Stormwater Utility Funding 

Oppose House Bill 4503 and Senate Bill 329- Limits local control on rental housing

Oppose House Bills 4431 and 4432- Expands legislative subpoena power into local government records 

Oppose Senate Bills 305-310- Restricts TIFAs from capturing increments from library millages

Oppose House Bill 4160- Allows solicitation for funds in public roadways

Oppose Senate Bill 221- Exempts Masonic Lodges from property taxes

Support House Bill 4397- Tax Tribunal Reform

Support House Bills 4150-4157- Expands FOIA to the legislature

 

Legislative priorities

 

2016

GLWA to be Involved in Lead Testing Rules

Support Wayne County Parks Millage

2015

Fireworks opposition

Oppose Presumptive Parole

Support Text to 9-1-1

2014

Regional Water Authority

Repeal Consumer Firework Sales